Valentines Love Bug Craft

We love spending time with our seniors. After the housework and personal care is all taken care of- we enjoy sitting down and watching them draw, paint or participate in the other crafts; it’s enlightening.  Seeing the smiles on their faces is heartwarming. However, as we get older, we lose dexterity and smaller things get harder to complete. The project below is a mid-level craft that allows the artist to be creative or as plain as they feel comfortable. Love Bug Brooch MATERIALS: Plaster of Paris Plastic spoon Safety pin Red and black acrylic paints Small paintbrush Clear varnish (optional) Mix up the plaster, then fill and level off the spoon. (Since you have to mix up a batch of plaster, you may want to make a few lovebugs at a time.) Place the safety pin into the wet plaster so that it opens out. Allow the plaster to harden for about an hour. Once dry, you can pop out the brooch and paint it red. Using the black paint and small brush (or cotton swab, if that’s easier), draw eyes, wings and a head on the lovebug; then cover the wings with hearts. If you want to make more than one,  feel free to switch up the design and decorate them with flowers, faces or other designs. To seal in the colors- apply a protective coating of clear varnish....

Senior Citizen Trivia

Reliving the past can be fun, especially when you can compete against your friends. Take our little quiz and share your score with your friends and family. How many questions can you get right? Who do you plan on asking? Note: We put the answers below…but no cheating. 1.In the ’50s, if you had a flat rear tire, you often had to remove the …? a. Necker knob b. Curb feeler c. Fender skirt 2. What color flash bulbs did Dad use for color film? a. Blue b. Pink c. Plaid 3. What was the “parking brake” called when you were a kid? a. Emergency brake b. Pull ‘n’ Stop c. Breaker. Breaker. 4. Way before Air Jordan, what was a kid’s shoe of choice? a. Buster Brown b. PF Flyers c. Old Stinkers 5. In what year did “Dewey Defeat Truman” according to the Chicago Tribune? a. 1946 b. 1948 c. 1952 6. Before the Orkin Man, what technology was part of most homes’ bug deterrence? a. Shoe Fly b. Fly paper c. 50 mm Phlit gun 7. Dixie cups had what printed on their tops? a. Secret decoders b. Movie stars c. WW II propaganda slogans 8. What was the prevailing method of birth control in the ’50s? a. Heavy lifting and cold showers b. Fear c. Girdles and crinoline petticoats 9. Jimmy Durante said what at the end of every show? a. “Aloha, my friends.” b. “Good night, Mrs. Calabash, wherever you are.” c. “Remember, wherever you go, my nose will get there first.” 10. “I’m Popeye the sailor man; I’m Popeye the sailor man. I’m...

Senior Citizen Exercise Clipmix

Not only is sitting at home boring, it is bad for your health as well. Although exercise and physical activity are among the healthiest things you can do for yourself, some older adults are reluctant to exercise. Some are afraid that exercise will be too hard or that physical activity will harm them. Others might think they have to join a gym or have special equipment. Yet, studies show that “taking it easy” is risky. For the most part, when older people lose their ability to do things on their own, it doesn’t happen just because they’ve aged. It’s usually because they’re not active. According to the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, inactive people are nearly twice as likely to develop heart disease as those who are more active. Lack of physical activity also can lead to more visits to the doctor, more hospitalizations, and more use of medicines for a variety of illnesses. We found a few low-impact exercises for seniors....

Where do you find your inspiration?

            Do you have a quote you like to live by?  Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve. –Napoleon Hill Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value. –Albert Einstein Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.  –Robert Frost I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took any excuse. –Florence Nightingale You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. –Wayne Gretzky I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. –Michael Jordan Definiteness of purpose is the starting point of all achievement. –W. Clement Stone The past is a ghost, the future a dream. All we ever have is now. –Bill Cosby Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans. –John Lennon Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do, so throw off the bowlines, sail away from safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails.  Explore, Dream, Discover. –Mark Twain The mind is everything. What you think you become.  –Buddha The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. –Chinese Proverb An unexamined life is not worth living. –Socrates   Your time is...

15 Superhuman Feats Performed by Senior Citizens

They say age is just a number, but what do you think? While scrolling the internet, we found this amazing post from Silver Cross Healthcare and couldn’t help but share. 1. Tatyana Fomina Superhuman feats are usually associated with guys in spandex packing muscles the size of mountains. Not so if you find yourself in Ulyanovsk, a Russian town home to the strongest 60-year-old woman in the world. Tatyana Fomina has lifted as much as 200 kilograms (about 440 pounds). No word on what type of lift that personal best encompassed, but she was 60 years old when she did it in 2007, according to a YouTube post from Russia Today, so we’ll file this away under, “Doesn’t matter, it’s enough.” Fomina didn’t start powerlifting until she was 48 years old. Source 2. Charles Atlas Charles Atlas, or Angelo Siciliano, started his fitness career at a much younger age than Tatyana Fomina, and becoming a senior citizen did little to slow his progress. In his heyday, Atlas could perform a one hand overhead dumbbell press of anywhere from 236 to 266 pounds (reports vary). Atlas referred to his younger self as a 97-pound weakling. Through a personal training regimen (that you’ll probably remember if you used to read comic books), he grew into the strongman the world would come to know. Atlas died of heart failure in 1972 at age 80, but according to FindAGrave, the muscleman continued working out at the New York City Athletic Club right up until his death. In fact, the day he died he’d just finished his daily jog. Heart problems ran in Atlas’ family, and...

Traveling for the Holidays

We found this article while scrolling the internet today and thought it would be appropriate to share with all of our wonderful readers. Below, we have included a few helpful passages from the article as well as a link to the original, if you wish to enquire further. -If possible, visit your older relative at his apartment or home. One’s living space is also a gauge in the progression of aging. Peek inside the refrigerator – is there expired food? Is there enough food for a few days? You may see unopened bills on the table – or overdue notices. These are also indicators that your older relative may be having difficulty keeping up with day-to-day responsibilities at home. While you are in the neighborhood knock on a neighbor’s door and ask if your older relative gets out of the house every day – or if his friends still visit from time to time. With aging comes the risk of isolation. -If you suspect that an older relative’s health is beginning to decline, then it’s time to begin a conversation and put a plan in place to help. Have a family meeting to get everyone up to speed and on board to assist when and where necessary. There are many automated systems that can easily be put into place for online payment of utilities, phone and other regular charges. Reach out to a neighbor or community organization to check on your older relative periodically. Starting this dialogue is also important because sometimes an older adult who may have lost some functional capacity may have unknowingly made some financial or...

Per Diem Makes the Holidays Warmer for Two Kindergarten Classes

Per Diem In Home Nurse Staffing Sends Monetary Donation to Local Elementary School This winter Per Diem Nurse Staffing (PDNS) has chosen to sponsor two kindergarten classes at Chase STEM Academy by making a $1,800 donation. Occurring over the past few months, PDNS owner, Brenda Michalski has been sending monetary donations to the teachers of the two kindergarten classes to make this winter a warmer, happier place for the students. The entire donation will be used directly on the two classes of kindergarteners at the academy. Room teachers at the school are in charge of purchasing items such as sweaters, hats, mittens and a holiday toy for each student. Beginning in 2011, PDNS wanted to donate a present to the children. Much to their surprise, most of the students asked for items such as coats, shoes, hats and other items to keep them warm. “Making this donation is just our way of giving back to the community,” says Per Diem Owner, Brenda Michalski. “ We pick organizations that don’t receive a lot of attention and we help them out; we also love receiving the thank- you letters and pictures from the students after they receive their presents. Helping others who can’t help themselves is what we do on a daily basis; why wouldn’t we apply that philosophy outside of the office?” Brenda and PDNS have several organizations they have supported throughout the years. Businesses such as the Waterville Chamber of Commerce, The Anne Grady Center, Chase STEM academy and a local youth softball...
Caregiver Burnout: Are You Aware of Your Needs?

Caregiver Burnout: Are You Aware of Your Needs?

Caregiver burnout can be a serious problem when looking after someone who is permanently or even temporarily unable to care for themselves. Being aware of your personal situation and how you react to stressful situations is key to identifying your burnout zone and keeping situations from escalating. The other day, one of our staff members was fortunate enough to catch the beginning of a domestic dispute before things turned serious. A patient and their child were in the middle of a yelling match when the staff member came into the house and broke up the disagreement. After hearing of this event, we decided it would be beneficial to provide a few helpful tips to prevent similar situations. Observe the social & recreational needs of family caregivers Stay social. Make it a priority to visit regularly with family and friends. Isolation will eventually turn into depression or resentment. Do things you enjoy. Laughter and joy can help keep you going when you face trials, stress, and pain. We suggest incorporating mutual interests between the patient and caregiver to do things you both enjoy. Maintain balance in your life. Don’t give up activities that are important to you, such as your work or your hobbies. Give yourself a break. Take regular breaks, and give yourself an extended break at least once a week. If possible, establish shifts with other family members who can take turns watching your loved one. Keep in mind Emotional needs of family caregivers Take time to relax daily and learn how to regulate yourself when you start to feel overwhelmed. Keep a journal. Writing down your thoughts and feelings is a good way to...

Halloween in Peddler’s Alley

  At Per Diem, we love Halloween! So we decided to make this blog post very photo-centric. Below, we have posted a few photos of our decorations and trick-or-treaters and we hope you...

Seniors and their Pets

Pets Help Our Hearts Studies show that older pet-owning citizens have lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels than non-owners, helping to reduce their risk for heart disease and decrease their number of visits to the doctor. Additionally, a number of other studies suggest that pet owners have a better chance for long-term survival after surviving a coronary event than non-pet owners. Studies show that older pet-owning citizens have lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels than non-owners, helping to reduce their risk for heart disease. Pets Help the Elderly Overcome Depression and Loneliness According to a study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, caring for a cat or dog helps elderly people overcome depression or loneliness. Whether that be from the loss of a loved one, not having family or friends nearby to interact with, or not being able to get out much, having a fluffy friend gives older citizens a sense of purpose since they have to take care of their pet and think about things other than their own problems. Even for elderly patients in nursing homes, animal-assisted therapy has shown to help patients decrease their anxiety levels and give them something to look forward to. Christina Miller, a former convalescent home activities director in Southport, N.C., says she witnessed the positive impact animals had on elderly patients when a local animal shelter made weekly visits to her facility. “Residents who normally weren’t active were suddenly getting up, petting and talking to the cats and dogs, smiling and interacting,” she says. “Patients would ask me, ‘Are the dogs here? Did they come yet?’ Half the patients had...